Physible

BM-GtuP3niZgKfYJx4Tix7iny1BHvPHLG4H

twitter.com/thevisalian:

    Matthew Green (A few thoughts on cryptographic engineering) | What's the matter with PGP? →

    privacyandtechnology:

    From the text:

    "Last Thursday, Yahoo announced their plans to support end-to-end encryption using a fork of Google’s end-to-end email extension. This is a Big Deal. With providers like Google and Yahoo onboard, email encryption is bound to get a big kick in the ass. This is something email badly needs. So great work by Google and Yahoo! Which is why following complaint is going to seem awfully ungrateful. I realize this and I couldn’t feel worse about it. As transparent and user-friendly as the new email extensions are, they’re fundamentally just re-implementations of OpenPGP — and non- legacy-compatible ones, too. The problem with this is that, for all the good PGP has done in the past, it’s a model of email encryption that’s fundamentally broken. It’s time for PGP to die."

    (Source: security.nl)

    — 14 hours ago with 10 notes
    "We will drown in sensors before we ever build a true internet of things" →

    imadeit-davidjanes:

    Stacey Higginbotham. I will note we could go a far way if (1) everyone who tracks data makes it easy to download programmatically, (2) the data is semantically marked.

    As sensors get cheaper, and as we’re better able to gather and aggregate data through middlemen such as IFTTT or platforms from Apple or Google, the number of sensors should increase exponentially. That’s not because we really need five different sensors tracking different aspects of our movement, or five different automotive sensors telling us our miles per gallon. Rather, it’s because there are no standards, no real data marketplaces and no real reason yet for all the companies in these different elements of each ecosystem to work together.

    — 3 days ago with 1 note

    Tune in on Wednesday, August 20th to watch John Legend perform LIVE from the Hollywood Bowl, in Los Angeles, California. Catch a new LIVE concert from Live Nation, on Yahoo Live daily, 365 days a year.

    — 1 week ago

    karisfieldnotes:

    coolthingsswd:

    Ode to Apollo 11 and the joy of discovery

    Beautiful

    — 3 weeks ago with 21593 notes
    futurejournalismproject:

Report: US Surveillance Harming Journalism, Law and Society
Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union released a report this week outlining the effect the US surveillance state is having on journalism, law and society. In particular, the two groups interviewed “50 journalists covering intelligence, national security, and law enforcement for outlets including the New York Times, the Associated Press, ABC, and NPR.”
Via Human Rights Watch:

[The report] documents how national security journalists and lawyers are adopting elaborate steps or otherwise modifying their practices to keep communications, sources, and other confidential information secure in light of revelations of unprecedented US government surveillance of electronic communications and transactions. The report finds that government surveillance and secrecy are undermining press freedom, the public’s right to information, and the right to counsel, all human rights essential to a healthy democracy…
…Surveillance has magnified existing concerns among journalists and their sources over the administration’s crackdown on leaks. The crackdown includes new restrictions on contact between intelligence officials and the media, an increase in leak prosecutions, and the Insider Threat Program, which requires federal officials to report one another for “suspicious” behavior that might betray an intention to leak information.
Journalists interviewed for the report said that surveillance intimidates sources, making them more hesitant to discuss even unclassified issues of public concern. The sources fear they could lose their security clearances, be fired, or – in the worst case – come under criminal investigation.
"People are increasingly scared to talk about anything," observed one Pulitzer Prize winner, including unclassified matters that are of legitimate public concern.

The report, With Liberty to Monitor All: How Large-Scale US Surveillance is Harming Journalism, Law, and American Democracy, can be downloaded here (PDF). The online Executive Summary is here.
Meantime, via The New York Times: “An internal investigation by the Central Intelligence Agency has found that its officers improperly penetrated a computer network used by the Senate Intelligence Committee in preparing its report on the C.I.A.’s detention and interrogation program.”
Image: Anonymous quote from a journalist interviewed for the report. Via Human Rights Watch.

    futurejournalismproject:

    Report: US Surveillance Harming Journalism, Law and Society

    Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union released a report this week outlining the effect the US surveillance state is having on journalism, law and society. In particular, the two groups interviewed “50 journalists covering intelligence, national security, and law enforcement for outlets including the New York Times, the Associated Press, ABC, and NPR.”

    Via Human Rights Watch:

    [The report] documents how national security journalists and lawyers are adopting elaborate steps or otherwise modifying their practices to keep communications, sources, and other confidential information secure in light of revelations of unprecedented US government surveillance of electronic communications and transactions. The report finds that government surveillance and secrecy are undermining press freedom, the public’s right to information, and the right to counsel, all human rights essential to a healthy democracy…

    …Surveillance has magnified existing concerns among journalists and their sources over the administration’s crackdown on leaks. The crackdown includes new restrictions on contact between intelligence officials and the media, an increase in leak prosecutions, and the Insider Threat Program, which requires federal officials to report one another for “suspicious” behavior that might betray an intention to leak information.

    Journalists interviewed for the report said that surveillance intimidates sources, making them more hesitant to discuss even unclassified issues of public concern. The sources fear they could lose their security clearances, be fired, or – in the worst case – come under criminal investigation.

    "People are increasingly scared to talk about anything," observed one Pulitzer Prize winner, including unclassified matters that are of legitimate public concern.

    The report, With Liberty to Monitor All: How Large-Scale US Surveillance is Harming Journalism, Law, and American Democracy, can be downloaded here (PDF). The online Executive Summary is here.

    Meantime, via The New York Times: “An internal investigation by the Central Intelligence Agency has found that its officers improperly penetrated a computer network used by the Senate Intelligence Committee in preparing its report on the C.I.A.’s detention and interrogation program.”

    Image: Anonymous quote from a journalist interviewed for the report. Via Human Rights Watch.

    — 1 month ago with 85 notes
    
Are you an extremist?
Since the news broke yesterday that we are an extremist publication according to the NSA, we at Linux Journal have thought a lot about what that might mean to our readers.
[…] So please join us in pronouncing that we support extremist causes like open source, online freedom, and the dissemination of helpful technical knowledge by adding one of these lovely graphics to your picture. And as always, thanks for your support. Available in red, black, or white.

    Are you an extremist?

    Since the news broke yesterday that we are an extremist publication according to the NSA, we at Linux Journal have thought a lot about what that might mean to our readers.

    […] So please join us in pronouncing that we support extremist causes like open source, online freedom, and the dissemination of helpful technical knowledge by adding one of these lovely graphics to your picture. And as always, thanks for your support. Available in red, black, or white.

    (via eidesis)

    — 1 month ago with 97 notes
    CPU and Memory are the New Crude Oil →

    continuations:

    The definition of a commodity is a good that is “supplied without qualitative differentiation.” You can’t charge more than others for crude oil, you have to turn it at least into gasoline. And if you really want to charge a lot more you have to turn it into a plastic product.

    CPU cycles and…

    — 1 month ago with 16 notes
    designersofthings:

3D Printing Big Dreams With CobbleBot
Everything is bigger in Texas and the Cobblebot is no exception. The latest 3D printer option to hit KIckstarter, Cobblebot is a low cost printer with a large build area of 15x15x15. The team behind Cobblebot have big dreams to shake up the 3D printing market to make these devices more affordable and able to do more than just print trinkets and iPhone cases.  
Read More

    designersofthings:

    3D Printing Big Dreams With CobbleBot

    Everything is bigger in Texas and the Cobblebot is no exception. The latest 3D printer option to hit KIckstarter, Cobblebot is a low cost printer with a large build area of 15x15x15. The team behind Cobblebot have big dreams to shake up the 3D printing market to make these devices more affordable and able to do more than just print trinkets and iPhone cases.  

    Read More

    — 1 month ago with 52 notes

    personalfactory:

    Will 3D Printing Make Drones Part of Our Everyday Lives?

    "The Engineers at the University’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) have successfully 3D printed a 1.5 meter wide unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Their production method shifted from time consuming traditional manufacturing with expensive tooling to more efficient 3D printable designs requiring minimal support material.” ~

    3dprintingindustry.com

    personalfactory:

    The question should be not will but when 3d printed UAV prototypes will transform into rather inexpensive mass manufactured commercial transportation/personal use drones ?

    — 1 month ago with 10 notes